Superior Mind, Superior Body

June 23, 2015. Filed: Recipes

Steak with Red Wine Gravy and Wilted Kale

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Straight from the ‘Coles Feed Your Family’ online page, this steak recipe is by former Masterchef contestant Michael Weldon. An easy variation of a simple meal with some added flavours while being high in protein and rich in vitamins and minerals.

Ingredients (serves 4):

  • 4 Scotch Fillet steaks
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 60 g butter
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 150 ml red wine
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 2 50 g Gravox Traditional Gravy Single Tub
  • 1 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 500 g kale, stalks removed (or
  • 1 1/2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 800 g baby washed potatoes, chopped, steamed, to serve

Method:

  1. Season the steaks with salt and pepper. Brush with half the oil. Heat a frying pan over high heat until very hot. Add the steaks and cook for 2 minutes. Turn and add the butter, thyme and garlic. Cook for 2 minutes for medium rare or until cooked to your liking. Baste the steak with pan juices. Transfer to a plate. Cover with foil and set aside for 5 minutes to rest.
  2. Meanwhile, combine the red wine and sugar in a small saucepan over a medium heat. Cook until the liquid reduces by 2/3 and the mixture is slightly syrupy. Add the Gravox and red wine vinegar. Stir over low heat to warm through. Remove from heat. Cover to keep warm.
  3. Heat the remaining oil and kale in a large saucepan over high heat. Stir until kale has wilted. Add the lemon juice and season with salt and pepper. Stir to combine.
  4. To serve, place the wilted kale on the plate. Top with steak and drizzle with the red wine sauce. Serve with steamed potatoes
June 22, 2015. Filed: JS-PT News, Nutrition

What’s changed with Australia’s new food pyramid?

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Making sense of what exactly is good and bad nutrition is a tough gig for most people. You could bet your bottom dollar that for every piece of information you find on what you should do, there will be a counter argument somewhere as to why you shouldn’t do it. Thankfully, Nutrition Australia finally released it’s new and revised food pyramid last month which aims to clear things up. Let’s take a closer look:

1. Vegetables take centre stage

The bottom layer of the food pyramid is now predominantly vegetables as well as legumes and fruit. With the high amounts of vitamins and minerals present in these foods, they have been linked to a reduced risk of a number of serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.. Vegetables and fruit are also high in fibre which helps with weight control. Given an estimated (and shocking) 7% of Australians reach the recommended daily intake of vegetables, this is a good start to the new pyramid.

On a side note, while both are good options, still aim to eat more vegetables than fruit.

2. Include healthy grains

The renamed carbohydrates group has shifted up from the bottom of the pyramid to put more emphasis on Australians eating more vegetables. Carbohydrates, even with their bad reputation these days, are essential in a healthy diet and the new pyramid encourages (whole)grains such as quinoa, brown rice, multigrain breads, and oats which are also all rich in fibre. That being said, other carbohydrate options such as white rice are not poor options and can easily be included in a well balanced diet.

3. Have a mix of different sources of protein

The second top layer emphasises consuming a variety of protein sources from dairy, meat, and non meat products. While red and white meats are the obvious choices of protein, people often forget dairy products (such as cottage cheese and greek yoghurt; whey protein powder also falls in this category) are also rich in protein as well as being high in calcium.

Consuming a mixture of fish, nuts, and seeds will not only give you variety in your protein, but will also help you reach your recommended intake of healthy fats.

4. Fat is good

Fats are often neglected but they have major roles in the body which include manufacturing and balancing hormones and improving brain and nervous system health. A mix of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are ideal for optimal health. They can be found in oils, avocados, nuts and seeds, fish, and eggs.

5. Junk food has been canned

The previous food pyramids had junk food at the top in the ‘eat in small amounts’ category, and whilst I think the amended food pyramid is much better, I will say that eating a small percentage (under 10% of your daily intake) on whatever you wish will not have an effect on your overall body composition and will also help you control cravings. For the average person though, not having the junk food option on the pyramid is the correct stance.

 

All in all, Nutrition Australia has done well with the updated version of the food pyramid. For the average person, it is a good starting point to refer to and if followed consistently would definitely improve the current eating habits of Australians unfamiliar with good nutrition practices. Putting more emphasis on vegetable intake is a much needed addition to the pyramid, and is definitely one aspect of nutrition which is hard to disagree on, regardless of what your good and bad nutrition stance is.

 

 

May 19, 2015. Filed: Recipes

Ginger Pumpkin Soup by Curtis Stone

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A real winter favourite with the addition of ginger which is rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties.

 

Ingredients:

o   1 large shallot (about 50g), peeled, cut in half

o   1 long red chilli (about 10g), cut in half

o   8cm-piece fresh ginger (about 30g), peeled, coarsely chopped

o   3 cloves garlic, peeled

o   2 limes, zest and juice separated

o   1/2 punnet fresh coriander (about 8g), leaves and stems separated

o   1 tablespoon canola oil

o   3 medium carrots, peeled, sliced

o   900g Kent pumpkin, peeled, seeded, cut into 3cm pieces

o   5 cups chicken stock or water

o   400ml can coconut milk

 

Method:

 

1. In a food processor, blend the shallot, chilli, ginger, garlic, lime zest and coriander stems to form a paste-like mixture.

2. Heat a medium heavy pot over medium-high heat. Add the oil and paste and cook for 2 mins or until mixture is fragrant. Add the carrots, pumpkin, stock and all but 2 tablespoons of the coconut milk. Cover and bring to a simmer. Cook for 20 mins or until vegetables are tender.

3. Using a blender, and working in batches, puree the soup with 2 tablespoons of lime juice until smooth and creamy. Season with salt. Ladle soup into bowls and garnish with remaining coconut milk and coriander leaves.

 

(From taste.com.au)

Keep motivated this winter and train with a friend.

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As the mornings become cooler and the daylight hours decrease, motivation for exercise before and after work can begin to diminish as it competes with extra sleep in a warm bed or a hot meal sooner in the evening. Sure you have that weight to lose, but what harm will missing one day really have? Well, these missed days tend to accumulate more when the weather is cooler and before you know it, your consistent routine is something of the past. Often in life, you need another person to inspire motivation, and exercise is no different.

Even if you are seeing a personal trainer for motivation, sometimes you need a little bit more. That little bit more comes in the form of a training partner. Whether it is your husband or wife, boyfriend or girlfriend, family member or best friend, training with someone else both in and outside of your PT sessions can be of great benefit to you. Some of the reasons include:

 

1. You’ll miss fewer sessions. When your motivation is lacking, you have someone else to answer to now. Cancelling is one thing, but you won’t want to cancel on a friend or your partner!

2. You’ll work harder. No one wants to be that person holding back the team. Training with someone else will push you to reach a higher intensity. You can also encourage each other throughout the workout.

3. Your bank account will thank you. When two people are training with a PT, you split the costs. This is a great way to receive extra attention to detail that a trainer can give you versus a busy boot camp.

 

At JS-PT, the most common 2-on-1 sessions are couples training together, however more friends are enquiring and starting these types of sessions due to the financial benefit. An extra benefit with the JS-PT 2-on-1 sessions is the option of training in a gym of which has no membership payment required, or training outdoors. Now keep your exercise frequency and consistency this autumn and winter, and find someone to start exercising with!

April 20, 2015. Filed: Health Tips, Tips

Keeping healthy when on the road

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You can have the best nutrition plan in the world, but if your compliance to the plan is low, your results will be minimal. Those that travel for work often know all about the challenge of remaining compliant with their plan, and even those that travel occasionally can relate. If you fall into this category, then the following strategies will help you increase your adherence to a nutrition plan.

 

Choosing the best location 

Whether you’re away for a conference for a couple of nights or working in an interstate office for the week, your first priority should be location. Not just in relation to where your work commitments are, but how close are you to supermarkets/gyms/restaurants from your hotel? Are you within walking distance? Without these type of places being close, it’s easy to make poor selections.

 

Choosing a room with kitchenette

Price is an obvious factor here, but a room with a kitchenette or even just a fridge, you can stock the room with healthy snacks/meals such as fresh fruit and vegetables, yoghurts, breads, sliced chicken/turkey, milk, bottled water etc.

 

Research restaurant menus in advance

If you intend on eating out, hop onto the websites of the possible restaurants where you intend on eating so you know what could potentially fit into your plan.

 

Bring protein supplements

Often the biggest challenge for people who travel often (even those who don’t) is maintaining adequate amounts of protein. If you are using the above strategies then you should be doing well to maintain sensible eating patterns, but bringing your own protein powder down is a good and quick fall back option if you aren’t able to eat as well as you would like.

 

While these are pretty simple steps to take when travelling, sometimes it is easier said than done to be compliant with a good eating plan. Put into place these strategies and help increase the likelihood of you remaining on track with your nutrition goals.

Inspired by Precision Nutrition
April 13, 2015. Filed: Nutrition, Recipes

Recipe: Zucchini Slice

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Zucchini slices are a great way to add more vegetables into your overall diet, especially when served with a side salad. They make for a great lunch, dinner, or snack, and are perfect for your weekly food preps. One of my personal favourites!

Ingredients:

2 zucchinis
4 eggs
2 spring onions thinly sliced
1 carrot
1 red capsicum
175g packet of short cut bacon
1 cup self raising flour
1 cup grated cheese of your choice (this was mozzarella)
1/4 cup milk
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Side salad: baby spinach, rocket, cherry tomatoes, spring onion, sunflower kernels

 

Method:

  1. Pre heat oven to 180 degrees. Grease a 20cm x 30cm lamington pan and line the base and 2 long sides with baking paper.
  2. Place the zucchini, carrot, capsicum, spring onion, bacon, cheese and flour in a large bowl and stir to combine. Add the egg, milk and oil and stir to combine. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Spoon the mixture into the prepared pan and smooth the surface. Bake for 40 mins or until firm to the touch. Set aside to cool. Cut into squares. Serve with side salad

 

(from taste.com.au)

March 11, 2015. Filed: Recipes

Recipe: Pumpkin and Chicken Red Curry

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Ingredients:

  • 100g peas

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Method:

Step 1Heat the oil in a wok or frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the curry paste and cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until aromatic. Add the coconut milk and water and bring to the boil.

Step 2: Reduce heat to low. Add the chicken, pumpkin and lime leaves and cook, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes or until pumpkin is tender. Add the beans, peas, lime juice, sugar and fish sauce and cook, stirring occasionally, for 3-4 minutes or until the beans are bright green and tender crisp.

Step 3: Serve with rice. Top with Thai basil leaves.

 

This is based on a recipe from www.taste.com.au

 

 

March 10, 2015. Filed: JS-PT News

JS-PT has a new home, and a new special offer!

After a couple of months of transitioning from one gym to another, JS-PT has officially made the full time move over to Flow2 Gym in Milton (159 Coronation Drive).

If you’ve been following the Instagram and Facebook pages, you would have seen a few photos and videos of all the action that’s been happening. With a wide array of equipment which includes a matrix style fit out, battle ropes, sleds, gymnastic rings, suspension training, kettle bells, and slam ball in conjunction with plenty of traditional free weights; this has made one on one sessions, small group sessions, and boot camps in the gym much more challenging and fun.

To celebrate this, JS-PT is offering newsletter subscribers their  first 2 sessions for only $22! So come in, and experience for yourself a workout that takes you to the next level! Email info@js-pt.com.au  for more info on how to get started. And whilst memberships to Flow2 are available, JS-PT clients don’t have to pay a membership to receive personal training/small group training (2-4 people).

 

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February 9, 2015. Filed: Nutrition, Recipes

Simple snack idea: Vita Wheat crackers with cream cheese, cucumber and smoked salmon

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This was an enjoyable afternoon snack for me last week; vita wheat crackers with cucumber, smoked salmon, cottage cheese with some cracked pepper and Tabasco sauce. 

Vita wheat crackers are wholegrain based so provide a good source of fibre and carbohydrates, while the smoked salmon contains B vitamins and minerals such as magnesium and selenium which aid your metabolism. Cottage cheese is not only a complete source of protein, but also is a great source of calcium which is crucial for bone health.

Change your serving size to suit your personal needs and enjoy!

 

 

February 9, 2015. Filed: Balanced Lifestyles, Nutrition

Controlling your energy balance

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I’m all for people starting small on their health goals, and gradually building to bigger things. Whether they are starting with smaller goals, or starting on smaller day in and day out habits, it all helps. Something is better than nothing right? However, are you someone that has made smaller changes in your exercise and eating patterns in order to lose weight, but still feel like you are going nowhere? This post may be for you.

 

Let’s start with some common small changes people make to help achieve weight loss goals:

–       Drinking low fat milk instead of full cream milk

–       Swapping sugar for stevia/sweetener in your coffee

–       Eating only wholegrain versions of different foods (i.e. Brown rice, or multigrain bread)

 

Whilst changing certain habits each day may help, too often people are caught up in the minor changes, and not focusing enough time on the major things that would be most beneficial. This is what I call ‘majoring in the minors’.

Solely changing to low fat milk or eating more wholegrain foods isn’t going to make a difference if you are not eating less calories overall. The energy balance equation is what matters:

 

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If you consume more than your maintenance calories each day (regardless of milk type, or whether wholegrain or not), you will put on weight. If you consume less, you will lose weight. So how do you measure your food intake? Track your food intake with an app like My Fitness Pal (as spoken about on a previous post here).

 

Needless to say, I still recommend that 80-90% of your food intake comes from whole and minimally refined foods for health reasons, and wholegrain foods are an important component in your diet due to their fiber content. But overeating is overeating regardless of the food type, so remember to keep focused on major changes such as controlling your overall food intake and overall activity level rather than minor changes, and I assure you this will make a bigger difference.

 

For specific nutrition coaching plans, feel free to email me on james@js-pt.com.au for any enquiries.

Welcome to 2015, now let’s get on with it!

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Before your holidays you were determined to keep exercising and eating well despite the inevitable blow out days that the end of December and start of January brings.

You had every intention of feeling great once you returned from your holidays because you had read my previous blog post of how to get through the Christmas and New Year period guilt free.

You’ve returned from your holidays and quite frankly you feel terrible because you did none of the above.

Sounds like you? You’re not alone!

 

Many of my clients, friends, family members, and fellow gym goers have developed a guilty conscious thinking back of their holidays. Some are doing something about it, some aren’t, but many still feel guilty to a certain extent. But now it’s time to move on. If anything, a break from training and/or food tracking may have given you some much needed time off for you to refresh the batteries. And while you think you may have put on a copious amount of body fat, you really haven’t. It’s only been 2 or 3 weeks, not enough to completely ruin your body! The time spent with family and friends with the enjoyment of different food and drinks is something to cherish, not remembered with guilt over your nutrition choices that day.

Now it’s time to focus on the now and the future. Remember the goals you were working towards, or refocus your mind on some new goals for 2015, and just get started in some way, shape or form. Put behind you whatever guilt you may have. Having your mind right and thinking about the positive rather than the past or the negative is crucial for achievement and fulfilment. Without that, you won’t succeed.

 

I hope everyone had a fantastic holiday, now be the best you can be in 2015!

 

December 8, 2014. Filed: Tips

5 tips to get you through the Xmas period guilt free

 

Christmas. One of my favourite times of the year in terms of eating… Fresh seafood, food hampers, trifles, champagne; the list could go on. It’s also a time when all that eating and drinking results in some unwanted weight gain, as I’m sure you’ve experienced during festive periods in years gone by.

While overeating will feel an inevitable outcome for some (although they are willing to accept the consequences), others can feel overwhelmed with guilt after the new year rolls in knowing they jumped off the wagon. To limit the overall damage both physically and mentally, I’ve compiled 5 tips which will help you indulge and enjoy a festive, guilt free Christmas.

 

1. Accept the fact you will likely consume more.

I’ve seen plenty of strategies online with the aim of ‘limiting the damage’ over Christmas with tips such as saying no to dessert, limit carbs, and a whole lot of other restrictive crap to ensure you stay within your calorie goals. That’s definitely not what you are about to read. Accept the fact that during this period you will attend parties, you will have big dinners and lunches, and you will have plenty of left overs. Cherish this time you will spend with your family and friends, be mindful of what’s enough to eat, and don’t stress about calories! The sooner you can accept that and not be so hard on yourself, the less guilty you will feel.

2. It’s OK to skip meals.

Christmas lunch with my family is my favourite meal of the year, and I’m sure many of you reading will feel the same way about your Christmas Day meals. Due to the amount of food I know I will be eating, usually I’ll skip breakfast beforehand to save room. This type of strategy could be used at anytime during the year, when you know you’re about to over-indulge, or when you unexpectedly over-indulge. Balance yourself out by eating smaller meals before or after if you need to.

3. Make better bad choices.

This is pretty straight forward. Just because you’re eating more than you normally do, doesn’t mean you need to completely blow your intake out of the water and consume as much as you can. That’s just silly. By all means enjoy what there is on offer, but you know when you’re full.

4. Keep moving.

As hectic as this period can be, try and schedule some activity in during those few weeks. I’m not saying you must go to the gym everyday, but it would be beneficial to keep yourself active to some extent, even if it was just walking along the beach or doing shorter workouts throughout your break.

5. Do the above and simply enjoy your break!

Enjoy the time you spend with your family, enjoy seeing your friends, enjoy the functions you attend with your work colleagues, and enjoy the fact you have a couple of weeks to do whatever you want! Keep up points 1 to 4 and you should be able to relax and enjoy everything that Christmas and New Year’s brings.

Take the above tips into consideration before the festive break, and you should feel in a good physical and mental state come the new year.

From the JS-PT team, have a very Merry Christmas and wonderful New Year! See you in 2015.

 

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